Treating Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP)

Treating Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP)

FIP is a progressive, fatal disease that may develop in cats following infection with a coronavirus. This session, given by Elizabeth Berliner, DVM, MA, DABVP, will provide an overview of FIP, covering disease transmission, clinical signs, and diagnosis as well as providing an update on new research that may lead to improved diagnostic testing and treatment in the future. Management and prevention of infection in shelter environments is emphasized. Read “Treating Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP)”

Feline Infectious Peritonitis: Latest Drug GS441524 as FIP Treatment & Prevention in Cats

Feline Infectious Peritonitis: Latest Drug GS441524 as FIP Treatment & Prevention in Cats

Sesame & Puff

FIP is known as a deadly disease for decades and no cat could ever escape from the fate of dying of this virus. But not anymore - the GS441524 injections found in 2017 had changed the game. Cats were found cured by this drug after a course of around 84 days of injections. However, since the drug is potentially a drug for also the virus causing Covid19, we do not know when - if ever - will this drug be officially approved by the FDA as a treatment for FIP.
Prevent the virus from spreading from cat to cat is equally important. While we know that the virus for FIP is not likely to be transmittable between cats, the FeCV (the original form of FIP virus) is transmittable from cats to cats and so to prevent FIP, we have to take measures to prevent FeCV from spreading from your infected cat to your healthy cats. Read “Feline Infectious Peritonitis: Latest Drug GS441524 as FIP Treatment & Prevention in Cats”

Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) in Cats: the Cause, Common Signs, and its relation to FeCV

Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) in Cats: the Cause, Common Signs, and its relation to FeCV

Sesame & Puff

The vet may tell you that your kitten got FeCV - feline coronavirus but what does it actually mean?
And the deadly FIP - feline infectious peritonitis that was once a disease killing 100 out of 100 infected cats? What is that and what is my cat's risk of getting that if the vet said my cat got FeCV?
Find out the answers to these question in this video!
I am planning make a Part 2 on diagnosis tests and a Part 3 on the possible preventive measures and treatments so make sure you subscribe our channel and stay tuned!

Tell us your thoughts on how our channel may improve by leaving comments below! Suggest new topics for us to cover if there is any that's on your mind! We would love to hear it all! Read “Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) in Cats: the Cause, Common Signs, and its relation to FeCV”

What is FIP Disease in Cats? (Easy & Complete)

What is FIP Disease in Cats? (Easy & Complete)

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a viral disease that occurs worldwide in wild and domestic cats. It is caused by a type of virus called a coronavirus, which tends to attack the cells of the intestinal wall.

In this video I answered questions like:
How do cats get the FIP virus?
What are the first signs of FIP in cats?
Can a cat survive with FIP?
Is FIP in cats contagious to other cats?
Can FIP be cured? Read “What is FIP Disease in Cats? (Easy & Complete) ”

en_GBEN